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Australians

Differences between America & Australia, Posts, Soapbox

My right to do what I want

It’s time for my weekly look at the differences between Americans and Australians.  This happened to me last night. I don’t think this would happen in Australia but I’d love to get some feedback from my Australian friends–or others who may have had a similar experience.

Am I looking at Australians through rose-coloured glasses? Is this being a bit harsh on Americans (not my friends though don’t you know)?  Or is it not a negative thing in a different context, with a different example?

Differences between Americans and Australians: my right to do what I want–you can’t make me

I’m sitting on the tarmac in Las Vegas airport on the last flight to Burbank (LA) and as we’re getting ready to pull back some smart arse starts talking back to the flight attendant.

While getting ready for the safety demonstration, the “hostie” asked him to please get off the phone as it was time to switch mobiles off.  Instead of wrapping up he kept talking.  She asked him again, quite patiently, to “please sir finish your call and switch off the phone.”  He kept talking, showing no signs of wrapping up his call.

Then minutes later when he was ready he said goodbye and switched off his phone. The hostie then reminded him that he must listen to her requests while on board the plane.

“I don’t have to listen to you, I turned off the phone before we took off, I can do whatever I want.”

Here we go.

She reminded him again that he needs to listen to their instruction and cautioned him.  With that she walks down the aisle to continue her checks.

He yells back again saying he can do whatever he wants.  (It’s his right).

The supervisor comes up the back to question him further.

“Excuse me sir are we going to have a problem on this flight?”

To which he says,

“No, she told me to turn the phone off, I got off the phone before the plane took off, she doesn’t have the right to tell me what to do.”

“Well sir, on board the flight you are required to follow our instruction so are we going to have a problem with that?”

“No, I did what she asked but if she asks me to pick my nose I’m not going to do that am I?’

“Well sir she is not going to ask you to do that.”

Blah, blah, blah on he goes about how he flies all the time and has never had a problem and how he’s going to write a letter to Southwest and how he’s already spent tens of thousands of dollars with them.

Then one guy ( who can fend for himself) stands up and says to the guy, “please stop talking, listen to them  so we can all go home”.

But Mr frequent-traveller-who-may-or-may-not-look-like-a-frequent-traveller is adamant he can say and do what he wants.

He is still rabbiting on about how he can do whatever he wants and his rights.

Meanwhile I sit back, three rows in front of him to the other side, and think, do I want to go home or do I want the plane to stop and get him off? My first thought is is he allowed to carry a gun? I’m guessing he’s not.  Or at least not a loaded one. Everyone is a cross between disbelief, sitting quietly hoping the issue will be resolved and looking back at him with intimidating stares begging him to pull his head in.

All he had to do was pull his head in.

I’m relieved when the plane stops and moves forward towards the gate. Now we’re sitting on the tarmac waiting.  The pilot asks us all to stay in our seats.  Is this going to turn ugly?  He must know something is going on.  Right?  How are those rights looking now mate?

Are we waiting for the cops to take him off the flight? Is he getting more ruffled sitting there knowing full well it’s because of a scene he caused?

So now I’m quietly anxious and nervous and text home an update. He didn’t pull his head in before why should he now? And as the minutes are counting down I’m thinking it’s obvious we’re waiting for someone to get him.  What on earth is he thinking?

Are we going to have an incident or are we waiting for him to cool down? But what if he’s waiting to cool down then when we get in the air he loses it?  Like my teenage girl when you think everything is ok, she remembers what happened then relives the anger.

The people in the row in front of me start talking about guns. Do you have one? What do you do? I couldn’t hear much of the conversation but I thought back about Lorie on Twitter and how she thinks if there’s a mass shooter there would only be two shots fired. What if the guy in front of me thinks he’s defending himself and fires a shot? Would he be a good shot and would the guy hurling abuse have a gun & shoot him or shoot the nearest person? What about stray bullets?

Would the guy with the bad attitude think it’s time to pull out his gun. And why am I thinking about who’s carrying a gun? Isn’t that what the strenuous security measures are there for?  But if you’re a psycho then could you get around the security measures?  Can I trust them? And why–if guns are a right and used for personal protection–are we not allowed to carry them on board a flight?

Am I going crazy?

Finally the doors were opened and two ground staff came to escort him off the flight.  I was so surprised to see two women and not security or police.

He was escorted off the flight in a bit of an anti-climax. Thank God. I was expecting a tantrum-like scene that would make my daughter look like an angel. He still didn’t really get it though. He was still playing the it’s-my-right power card and “you just can’t do that” to him.

Here’s the thing. In “the future” post October 21, 2015 (had to get a Back to The Future Day reference in there somewhere), post 9/11, post mass murder after mass murder you just can’t do that. You just can’t do that.

So we’re taking off half an hour later than scheduled but I feel safer. I started thinking about what would happen if we were in the air and he wouldn’t stop. Then what. Would we have to pull together and fight him down. Cause I would. I’d be amongst it. I’m not going down wondering.

So you see it’s not your usual “Difference between Americans and Australians” post.  The rest of the flight–filled with Americans–did not agree with this guy.

But engrained somewhere in many American’s psyche is that whole “my right to…” thing.  And it’s not always a bad thing.  Sometimes it’s used for good and not evil.  But I wonder if America and its taglines “living the dream” or “the land of the free” leads some of its citizens to believe that means they can do whatever the bloody hell they want.  Because it’s their god-given right.

And, by the way, dickheads are all over the world.

In Australia we have dickheads you can put up there on Wikipedia as the ultimate definition of a dickhead.

We have bogans that think they’re tough and give lip.  And in Australia I wouldn’t be scared of guns I’d be scared of the fighting–fists as weapons which do get through the security checks.  But I think in Australia we might be more worried about the consequences. I don’t think we’re prepared to take the chance that we might be black-banned from flying again–or at least for a long time. I don’t know.

That’s where you come in. What do you think? What would you do? Do you think a guy would talk back to–and continue to talk back to–a hostie and then a supervisor on a Qantas internal flight or Virgin flight?

When we landed I felt like doing American/Chinese style woo-hoos and clapping that I landed safely. What a bizarre situation. Come on Chuck Lorre we can make an episode out of this one. Let’s do it.

Meanwhile. I’m exhausted and signing off.  And weirdly, the kids didn’t know what had happened to me but when I came home they raced out of their rooms and welcomed me home with hugs and kisses. Yep, life is short … and too short to be a dickhead.

xx It Started in LA xx

PS:  My congratulations to the crew of the Southwest Airlines 845PM flight 143 from Las Vegas to Burbank who handled the situation with professionalism and putting our safety ahead of their schedules.

Gun control or Pro gun
Differences between America & Australia, Posts, Soapbox

Difference between Americans and Australians: guns

Difference between Americans and Australians: guns

Another week, another shooting. But it’s not about the guns. Guns don’t kill people. No wait, the bullets do, no the people do. Wait, who kills people? The cars kill the people. No the drunk people driving the cars kill the people. Wait. The vacuum cleaner does the vacuuming, no the person does the vacuuming. I’m confused.

This is arguably the single most dividing issue between Australians and Americans. And it’s not all Americans and my guess is it’s probably not all Australians either.

After a shell-shock week, my daughter and I have been questioning whether or not it’s time to move back home.  And while my son isn’t as vocal as we are his Twitter and Facebook has had their fair share of “the gun debate” issues.  Mr H? He’s in London so all’s good in his world.

What Americans think about guns

We’ve heard sound grabs of the likes of Donald Trump who shoot their mouth off because they can–to get on TV screens, radios and column inches in the papers and on websites and that’s fine. We expect it. It’s not great but we can live with it.

But you don’t expect it from the media.  At least I didn’t.  You might have seen this clip doing the rounds during the week:

 

It got me—and many, many others—so incensed I thought we should call for the sacking of these ill-informed presenters.

And clearly I should have better researched my stance.  Because in doing more research for this piece I found another Fox News presenter ranting pro guns.  Apparently “they” say that Fox regularly preaches right-wing conservative views.  I found this review on Fox and Friends which made me chuckle.  No wonder I’ve never tuned into Fox News.

Even less surprising is that I haven’t heard anything from either Fox News or Fox & Friends in response to my suggestion–I guess any publicity is good publicity.  Hmmm…

Clearly, for a network like Fox to put these people up there to a national audience this is purportedly representative of America’s views on guns.

And to a large extent it is. Many Americans genuinely believe in their right to bear arms.  And believe stuff like this:

http://twitter.com/sonslibertytees/status/623553547603415041/photo/1

Back to the Fox and Friends story.  When it started appearing on Facebook I did a Twitter search for the show. I found another story on one of the presidential candidates Ben Carson discussing gun rights. Here’s some examples of the response on twitter:

And I had this fun Twitter exchange during the week:

Damn that I misspelt cowboy! That was the last I heard from Kimberly Huggard.

Then there was this:

Nice one Lori.  And there’s this:

Oh look… it’s in response to Fox News again. I’m finally seeing the pattern.

And while we’re on the subject of Fox News presenters here’s another one just for fun:

http://twitter.com/mmfa/status/649407149072781312/photo/1

Thankfully not all Americans share the same views.

OK, so while new host Trevor Noah isn’t American, his audience is laughing.  If you’re interested–cause there are funny grabs there–I’ve chopped the segment down and you can watch it by clicking on this link.

What Australia thinks about guns

Not just the Australia, the rest of the world. Piers Morgan has been very vocal on the issue. Unlike many of the arguments pro guns cheerleaders are outlining, some prominent (and other stupid) public figures, he’s done his research and uses logic and reasoning as the basis of his argument.

But this isn’t really about him is it? It’s about Australians and our general attitude to guns.

Australians haven’t grown up to believe we have a constitutional right to carry a gun so we’ve got a fundamentally different perspective on the matter.

We don’t believe that if we send our kids to College with guns they won’t get shot.  (We believe in sending our kids to Uni without guns and still not being shot).

I wish I was a cartoonist and I could draw a cartoon of a mad shooter coming in with his gun showing the entire class dressed as cowboys drawing their guns from their holsters like they’re Quick-Draw McGraw asking for a truce while they draw their guns so they can shoot him first.

They seriously think that if they don’t arm teachers and don’t abolish gun-free zones this leaves the students exposed and vulnerable.

And they seriously think that it’s better to have an all-out shoot-it-out.

Or, like poor old Kimberly Huggard on Twitter thinking there would only be two shots fired.  Two.  And that is assuming the shooter shot the first one and some hero with a gun in his pocket takes a clean shot and takes out the shooter. How romantic a notion Kimberly. Bravo.

No, in Australia we can’t bear to hear the arguments in favour of guns.  Completely intelligent people just need to say one thing in favour of guns like this…

… then he’s lost all credibility with us.  Really? …. Really?  Seriously?

But what is the difference between Americans and Australians when we’re talking about guns?

Australian comedian Jim Jefferies, also doing the rounds of Facebook & Twitter, best sums up Australia’s views on guns. He’s Australian and it’s stand-up so he swears like it’s 3am and he’s had 500 beers.

If the Americans can get over the swearing it’s educated, logical and bloody funny.

 

On a personal note, scrolling through comments and Twitter have left me feeling sick to the stomach. The indignation and righteousness of Tucker Carlson (never trust someone with two last names) makes me want to pack my bags and run back home.

I love lots of things about living in LA—and I’m thankful I’m not surrounded by ignoramuses suggesting we arm our kids and teachers with guns to protect themselves—but you only have to witness the hateful attacks on those trying to curb gun violence to wonder if they’ll ever stop and reflect.  And use logic.

I’m hoping this country will evolve and look past “my right” to carry a gun which is effectively saying I don’t give a shit about the repercussions to the society I live in, as long I can do what I want.

xx It Started in LA xx

 

Cultures
Posts, Soapbox

Can we laugh at ourselves? I mean really laugh at ourselves?

Can we laugh at ourselves, meaning Australians , British, American, South Africans, Chinese whatever race you are?  Can we take it when another race has a go at us?  (Hopefully it’s a go at us in jest rather than in spite I hasten to add).

I ask this question because yesterday I was entertained by one of the Bloggers I follow posting an article on her Facebook page, “20 weird things that Americans don’t realise make them weird.”

I thought it was funny, she clearly thought it was funny or she wouldn’t have shared it.  But the responses she got shocked me.  I’m sure she wasn’t expecting that otherwise she may not have posted it.

Before we turn this into a “see that’s why I don’t like Facebook” bitchfest let’s move on from that for the sake of the story.  I happen to love Facebook.  For me it does more good than bad.

You see, lots of people hopped on and got really defensive.  They put their hands on their heart and stood up for themselves.  I’m wondering if it was just me who laughed it off or whether others could laugh it off as well.

By blogging about this I sincerely hope I don’t offend my American friends because that’s definitely not my aim.  I didn’t even share it on Facebook after seeing the barrage of comments and discussion it incited on her page.

Comments like “weird to whom?” “Everyone’s definition of weird is different.”  Of COURSE it is.  That’s the whole point.  Weird is something that goes both ways.  America’s love for canned cheese is weird to us Aussies (& Brits) and most likely our LACK of canned cheese is weird to them.  Newsflash: weird isn’t actually all that bad, it could be a good thing.

Then a person really went on the defense saying “Ah, do the damn math(s) in your head,” (in response to #3 why doesn’t the price on items here include  tax–why isn’t it the final price).  “If you’re living in that state you should know what your sales tax is,” she went on to say.  Isn’t that the point?  Why SHOULD we do the math in our head?  We’re not going to pay that price, they’re going to collect the TOTAL so why not list the full price?  It IS weird.  To us.  Because we’re not used to it (and neither should we get used to it).  We’ve seen it done our way and seen it done their way and we’re happy to give our brains a rest!  And do it our way.

America is a smart country; a) they get lots of tourists who don’t necessarily know you add tax or the tax rate for that state (or which state they’re in from one day to the next) and b) you can see other countries put the price including tax wouldn’t someone wake up and go, “World’s Best Practice, that’s so much easier, let’s change the way we do things.”  Change the bloody way you price things!

I digress again because that’s not the reason I decided to Blog about it either.

No, the reason I decided to Blog about it is because I read this story (which I’d been avoiding clicking into for days) about a CNN report taking the piss out of the New Zealand welcome for William, Kate & George (to me, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge to you) on their recent royal tour.

I think we as Australians can laugh at ourselves–we’re a small country who does pretty well at sport, we’ve got some really talented actors and creative guys in Hollywood, not too bad at business and we have a LOT of bogans.  Our most successful comedy shows are those where we take the piss out of typical Australians (bogans or not).

But watching that CNN story made me cringe.  I’m not even from New Zealand and by the way Australians (as a rule) aren’t even supposed to like New Zealanders and this still made me cringe.

So what’s the difference between the San Francisco Globe article and the CNN story?  I think it’s that the CNN story seemed so condescending and ill-informed.

The journalist issued a half-assed apology which said we all got it wrong because she “does humour and satire and maybe we just didn’t get it”.  But I’m not sure it was the right approach.  Save it for Letterman sweetie, or the Comedy Factory.

OK, step back a minute, it’s not many people that greet the future King & Queen of England showing his (mighty taut) bum.  Lucky him.  Lucky Kate.  But, let’s face it that wasn’t why he was showing her his ass.

I wrote a piece last week about racism in America.  My daughter chuckles at school about how everyone seems quick to say, “racist much”.  They’re so aware of saying the right thing.  So why poke fun of the New Zealand culture and heritage.  Racist much.

I wonder if the shoe was on the other foot if a New Zealand journo poked fun at an “Native American” custom what reaction that would get.  CNN might get the experts in for that one (and hopefully give a rest to the “breaking news” coverage of the missing Malaysian Airlines flight.  Meow).

I don’t agree with everything in the Mamamia story either, I think in their own country Americans ARE culturally sensitive (as I wrote about last week maybe too much).  BUT did we have a right to get defensive about the CNN story but not the San Francisco Globe story?

I’d like to quote the last two paras of the article because it sums it up nicely:

“Just because an event is different from what you are used to or outside your prism of experience, doesn’t mean it is something to be laughed at. And when you’re a national broadcaster, you have a duty to help inform and educate your viewers; to help them understand the context of the news they are watching.

“CNN’s coverage was an insult to those who gave up their time to so generously welcome the royal couple to New Zealand. And it was also insulting to the intelligence of their American viewers; who deserved more from that news report than an appeal to base ignorance.”

Ah controversy.  Gotta love it!  Let me know your thoughts, I’m very interested!

xx It Started in LA xx

photo source: news.nationalpost.com

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